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The knuckle-biting story of the first lunar landing from the people who were there.

By Jennifer Bogo

It was the most famous step in history. When Neil Armstrong's boot first touched lunar soil on July 20, 1969, the event was celebrated worldwide as a triumph for humankind. And yet the hazy television images broadcast from space failed to convey the true audacity—the enormous risks, the technological complexity, the intricate teamwork—of the mission that put two Americans on the moon.

Popular Mechanics set out to document the full and unvarnished story. July 16, 1969, marks the first day of the historic mission. Here, sleepless news correspondents and operations engineers, flight directors and astronauts take us to the point where the rocket clears the tower and responsibility shifts from Launch Control at Cape Kennedy to Mission Control in Houston for the crew's coast to the moon .

*Additional reporting by Davin Coburn, Adam Hadhazy, Joe P. Hasler, Erika Check Hayden, Clara Moskowitz, David Noland, and Elizabeth Svoboda.

**This post was originally published in the June 2009 issue of Popular Mechanics to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11 . Since then, first man on the moon Neil Armstrong passed away in 2012. A new biopic starring Ryan Gosling as Armstrong, called First Man , comes to theaters in October 2018.

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* JoAnn Morgan, instrumentation controller, Apollo Launch Control, Kennedy Space Center: The pad at night was just glorious to see with the whole vehicle bathed in these giant xenon lights. Because I got there before 3 am, it was near the very end of the propellant loading; there was a little venting of the liquid oxygen. It was just an enchanting sight to see, and I had the most positive feeling that this launch was going to be successful from the minute I parked my car and walked up to the firing room.

JoAnn Morgan, instrumentation controller, Apollo Launch Control, Kennedy Space Center:

* Jackie Smith, spacecraft test and launch operations engineer, Kennedy Space Center: Launch days were always a bit out of the ordinary because you'd get up in the middle of the night and go to work.

Jackie Smith, spacecraft test and launch operations engineer, Kennedy Space Center:

* Jay Barbree, correspondent, NBC News: I'd been feeding radio spots until about midnight, so I never went home--I slept out there on a cot at Press Site 39.

Jay Barbree, correspondent, NBC News:

* Morgan: As instrumentation controller, I was monitoring everything on the pad. It's extremely intense work. When you're going through the countdown and the launch you're very focused. Everything is preplanned--it's like a script in a play.

Former PhD and postdocs

• Cécile Rinaldi/Guinet (PhD, 2004-2007, co-advisor, F Martin), now Project Managerat ANSES, Laboratoire de Santé des Végétaux , Nancy, France

• Mehdi Kaytoue (PhD, 2007-2011, co-advisor, A Napoli, INRIA, LORIA Nancy), now Lecturer at LIRIS , Lyon, France

• Stéphane Hacquard (PhD, 2008-2011; post-doc fellow, 2012-2013, co-advisor, F Martin), now Researcherin Paul Schulze-Lefert ‘s group at MPI, Koln, Germany

• Benjamin Petre (PhD CJS INRA 2009-2012, co-advisor, N Rouhier, post-doc CJS INRA 2013-2014 in S Kamoun’s labat TSL, Norwich, UK), post-doc in Sophien Kamoun ‘s lab at TSL, Norwich, UK; Research Topic specialistat Frontiers in Plant Science / Frontiers Media in 2016/2017, now Scientific communication in Nancy.

• Natalya Saveleva (Post-doc ANR, 2013-2014)

• Antoine Persoons (PhD, 2012-2015, co-advisor, S De Mita, F Halkett), now post-doc in Diane Saunders team at the JIC, Norwich, UK

• Cécile Lorrain (PhD CJS INRA 2014-2018, co-advisor A. Hecker), now postdoc CJS in Cheap Prices Reliable Cheap Sale Sneakernews KNITWEAR Jumpers Klixs Jeans MFDqRXY9
in Plön/Kiel (Germany), 2018-2019.

My current work focuses on…

Populus and Melampsora genome analysis

– Rust comparativegenomics (in the Melampsoraceae and Pucciniales, includingthe coffee rust Hemileia vastatrix and the Asian Soybean Rust Phakopsora pachyrhizi )

– Molecular basis of poplar-poplar rust R-Avr interactions

– Functional analysis of rust effectors inhost cells

– Annotation and study of NB-LRR genes in Poplar and Oak genomes

Melampsora larici-populina urediniospore germination

(©photo, Petre – Pop’art, Seb)

Active projects

• Rust genomics

Several collaborative projects are ongoing in the frame of the Community Science Program of the US DoE Joint Genome Institute (Walnut Creek, CA, USA):

• Functional analysis of Candidate Effector Secreted Proteins (CSEPs).

Targeted CSEPs of Melamposra larici-populina are studied for their potential functions in the host cell. Heterologous systems such as the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana are used for localization and partner identification in the plant cell. Stable transformation of the poplar clone INRA 717-1-1B4 is used to validate localization and partners in poplar.RecombinantCSEPsare produced in E. coli and their structures are studied by NMR. Locally, Arnaud Hecker and Nicolas Rouhier (Lorraine Univ, France) are keyactors and thisproject involves past and ongoing collaborations with Sophien Kamoun(TSL, UK), Hugo Germain(Trois-Rivières Univ, Quebec,Canada), Andre Padilla and Karine de Guillen(CNRS/INSERM, Montpellier, France).

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